Choosing to be a sustainable company

When I was younger, I never really understood the importance of recycling. Growing up, I started to learn a bit more about global warming and the impact caused from human activities on our beautiful planet Earth. Recycling is one of the best and most beneficial ways for you to have a positive impact on the world.

When we came up with the idea for Skóra, we knew immediately that we would be a sustainable company by using recyclable bottles & recyclable mail bags. We wanted to know that by making these simple choices, we are making as little impact as possible on our planet which is aligned with our company values as an earth-conscious business.

Recycling is extremely important as rubbish has a massive impact on the natural environment; a lot of harmful chemicals and greenhouse gasses are released from rubbish in landfill sites every day.  When we recycle, this helps to reduce the pollution which is caused by rubbish sites. Because of this, habitat destruction and global warming are effects caused by deforestation. Recycling reduces the need for raw materials so that these rainforests can be preserved.

You may not be aware that out of the millions of tons of plastic produced each year, only roughly 5% of it is reclaimed. THIS IS HORRIFYING!!!
A huge amount of plastic, around eight million metric tons every year, ends up in the ocean, which of course pollutes our oceans and endangers our marine life.

Please, please, please, when using our Skóra products, we plead that you recycle all our materials. They are all recyclable and you are doing your part to help this wonderful planet we live on. By making simple, smarter choices (not just for our products but for all recyclable/bio-degradable products), you are keeping your carbon footprint as low as reasonably possible and preserving our environment for future generations to come.

Beautifully you,

Tenille xx

 

References:

https://ocean.si.edu/conservation/pollution/upcycled-ocean-plastic

https://wastelandrebel.com/en/how-on-earth-does-all-the-plastic-get-into-the-oceans/